Preppy Relaxed Mix with Sporty, and Serve

Preppy Relaxed Mix with Sporty, and Serve

A friend of mine on the West Coast posted on my Facebook wall, "OK, I need fashion help. I need to go shopping for my fall [and now winter] wardrobe. Any suggestions?"

Pretty straightforward question except, going through her most recent Facebook photos, I couldn't really pinpoint her style. Definitely wasn't high femme. Definitely wasn't masculine. Not androgynous, not woodsman, not street goth, not dapper. Certainly not hipster, punk, or rock and roll. So, I asked her to describe her current style and she commented back, "Preppy relaxed, if that makes sense...with sporty mixed in." Additional guidelines were (a) she did not want to look too masculine, (b) she wanted clothing for the weekend, not for work, (c) no skirts or dresses, (d) nothing too flashy, and (e) she was willing to wear a heel from time to time (use sparingly). Based on these specifications, I created a Pinterest board with style inspiration for her.

I have to say that creating the Pinterest board was really frustrating as a QPOC. The majority of images that I found to best represent my friendís style were of thin, white bodies, which is similar to the current trend in androgynous fashion. When I entered the terms "sporty," "preppy," "collegiate," "J. Crew," and "Gap" on Pinterest, the search results were of faces and bodies that looked nothing like mine; rather, the images were very homogeneous. I took to Google, but found the same. The lack of brown and curvy bodies was astounding but not surprising, because our bodies are erased from existence in many ways. Take for example the book Take Ivy, a 1965 collection of photographs shot at Ivy League campuses across America. Take Ivy is often considered to be ìthe bible of Ivy League style, even though the book documents a primarily white experience; there was only one black student featured in the entire book. In 2010, Kissi and Gumbs responded to this inadequate representation with their wildly popular Black Ivy fashion editorial. In 2012, dapperQ responded to the lack of queer bodies in both Take Ivy and Black Ivy with our Queer Ivy feature.

Years later, we still have so much work to do. Luckily, we have blogs like Qwear to give us visibility. In the meantime, take a look at some of what I found for my friend (evolving Pinterest board here, keeping in mind the lack of diversity represented in this aesthetic:

From: Gurl

From: Gurl

From: Good Taste.
From: Gabi Fresh
From:  Clara Belle

From:  Clara Belle

From: Marion WD

From: Marion WD

From:  Style.com

From:  Style.com

From:  Pinterest

From:  Pinterest

From: ASOS

From: ASOS

Anita Dolce Vita is the Managing Editor at dapperQFollow her on twitter @DolceFemmeAnita

Got your own preppy relaxed with sporty mixed in to show us? Tweet your photo @qwearfashion and we may just retweet it!

Anita Dolce Vita is a fashion and culture blogger who has been featured in Vice, Nylon, The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, Huffington Post Live, San Francisco Weekly, Everyone Is Gay, AfterEllen, Autostraddle, Diva, Curve, Canada’s Globe and Mail, Beijing Review, and Bosnia’s Manjine.BA. She is currently the owner, Creative Director, and Editor-in-Chief of the queer style blog dapperQ.