Queering Dapper

Anonymous asked: "Hey, so I just found your blog, and hey! it seems to be one of few really thorough queer style blogs on the whole internet. Which is pretty amazing.

"I think your blog is great. my question however is about the recurring reference to 'dapper,' I know the definition (i.e neat and trim in dress, appearance, or bearing), but i really would like your interpretation, in regard to queer style that is. AND why it is important?"

Kind words much appreciated, friend! What a great question. Thanks for making me think about my word choices and why they are important to me. It’s definitely one of those words that has a lot of meanings and you can’t quite pin exactly what it means to every individual.

(source: closeupandprivate.com <— dope blog of close up fashion)

"Dapper" to me denotes a classic and traditional style, in to addition dressing smart and looking put together. Its use was originally for cis men who were thought of as gentlemen. Already by using it as queers or gender non conforming individuals, we are changing the meaning of the word and making it our own. So that’s one reason why it is important.

(source: styleforum.net)

I do associate specific clothes and looks along with the word, like brogues, bow ties, vests, brown leather, suspenders, fedoras, elbow patches, tweed, suits, button-ups tucked in, flat caps, pocket squares.

(source: deltoroshoes.com)

I also think it is the only way to describe exactly the way some of us want to look; smart, put together, classic, with clothes that fit extraordinarily well, but not necessarily for a formal event. I think it airs away from the more conservative ways of dressing that you might think of when just talking about formal wear or business casual clothing. The closest equivalent probably being dandy.

(source: juleofthenile.blogspot.com) <— awesome post and about gender bending clothes.)

And I mean, it’s such a FUN word! Better than smart, put together, clean cut, or anything else you could think of to describe the look.

As Qwear's Founding Editor, Sonny’s work centers around envisioning a future in which the clothing people wear does not dictate their chances of survival. Sonny was awarded 2015 dapperQ of the Year and was the first trans blogger to be sponsored by Topman. In March 2016, Sonny spoke at South by South West's first official queer fashion panel.