Index

A

Accessories
Ace
Activists
Adidas
Allison Graham
Alok Vaid-Menon
Anna Rae
Androgyny
Angie Chuang
Anita Dolce Vita
Anthony Urbano
Ascots
Ashley Yielding
Athletic Wear

B

Backpacks
Bags
Bandanas
Basics
Bass
Beards
Beauty
Belts
Beyoncé
Bing
Bindis
bklyn boihood
Boi
Boots
Bolo Ties
Bow Ties
Black Outfits
Black and White Outfits
Black and Brown Outfits
Black History Month
Blake
Blazers
Blue
Braids
Bluestockings Boutique
Brooks Brothers
Bright Colors
Budget Shopping
Bullying
Butch

C

Cee Sando
Celebrities
Chinos
Collars
Collar Tips
College
Commentary
Community
Couples
Converse
Costumes
Courtney Stirn
Crop Tops
Cuffs

D

Dapper
DapperQ
Dandy
Denim
Desi
Dev Blair
People with Disabilities
Dismantle Me
Dove
Dreads
Dr. Martens
Drag
Dresses

E


Eco Friendly
Editorial
Elbow Patches
Elders (55 +)
Engagements
Esther Quek
Events
Everlane
Express

F

Fanny Packs
Fat
Fat Femmes
Femme
Fit
Fit For a Femme
Flannel
Florals
Formal
Fossil

G


Gender Expression
Genderflux
Giveaway
Glam Drag
Glitter
Graduation
Green
Grunge
 

H

Hair
Hair Color
Halloween
Handkerchiefs
Hannah Cohen
Hats
Head Scarves
Head Wraps
Health
Heels
Hip Hop
History
Holidays
How to Wear

I


Indigenous
Indochino
Interview
Inspiration

J


Jack Tar 207
Jaime Marie Estrada
Janelle Monáe
Janet Mock
Jaypix
Jeans
Jewelry

K


Kids (13-)
Kilts

L


Lace 
Lacoste
Latinx
Lavern Cox
Leggings
Leon Wu
Lesbian
Lingerie
Lipstick
LOL
LuzMarina

M


Make Up
Maternity Wear (for all genders)
Matriarch
Menswear
Minimalism
Modcloth
Monochromatic
Mojo Disco

N


Natural Hair
Nautical
News
Nonbinary
Nordstrom
Novelty Prints

O


Orange
Overalls

P


Paisley
Pants
Patterns
Pattern Mixing
Performers
Personal
Petites
Piercings
Pink
Plaid
Plus Sizes
Pocket Squares
Polka Dots
Pomps
Posture Magazine
Power Clashing
Prep
Pride
Prom
Puma
Punk

Q


QTIPoC
Qweary
Qwearly Dashing

R


Rainbow
Rayban
Red
Red Wings
Refashion Qwear
Review
Runway
Rupi
Ryley Rubin Pogensky

S

Saint Harridan
Sam Murray
Sarah Champagne
Sarah Rose
Sean/ Ex-Southern Belle
Seersucker
Sharpe Suiting
Shoes
Shopping
Skirts
Sneakers
Snap Backs
Socks
Soft Butch
Sonny Oram
Sporty
Spring
Street Style
Streetwear
Style Profile
Steam Punk
Submissions
Suits
Summer
Sun Sun
Swimwear

T

Tailoring
Tartan
Tattoos
Teal
Teens (14-19)
Ties
Tights/Stockings
Thrift Stores
Timberland
Tomboy
Tomboy Femme
Top Button Swag
Topman
Topshop
Trans
Transfeminine
Transmasculine
Travel
Tutorials
Tuxedos
Tweed
Two Spirit
Tyler Roze

U

Ugly Sweaters
Uniqlo
Unisex
Undercuts
Underwear

V

Vans
Video
Vintage
Vegan

W

Watches
Weddings
Womenswear
Workwear
Winter
White Outfits
Xanh Tran

Y

Yellow

Z


Zara

Interview on Queer Fashion Blogging and Industry with Sonny

Interview on Queer Fashion Blogging and Industry with Sonny

A few weeks ago a company doing research on fashion trends related to gender nonbinary styles reached out to me for an interview.

The interview was all for internal use and not to be published, but I enjoyed talking to them and found their questions so engaging that I decided to get a transcript and share my favorite snippets with everyone. I'm interspersing photos I took last fall with my good friend Sarah Champagne at Harvard which I feel have a particular Boston flavor, and were inspired by this Ivy League shoot

Sonny wearing a wool baseball cap, a checkered Topman button-up, a navy sweater, posing in front of brick building while adjusting their collar

Would you say that you've ever had difficulty find clothes that fit your style, or do you feel like there are plenty of resources for it?

Clothes that fit my body, yes, I have had trouble. Of course, no matter who you are, it's going to be hard to find clothes off the rack that fit because they are designed for a very specific body type. And it's important for people to know that, that gender non-binary people are not the only ones who struggle. I had to try on so many things before I could find the right pair of pants, that didn't have an awkward bulge or something. Or, a button-up that would fit over my hips without being really awkward in the shoulders.

I found a few solutions. The first was that I found the brands that fit the best; so Topman and Everlane's button-ups just fit me really well, as opposed to something like American Eagle, where everything is just too big.

The other thing I discovered is that we have all these ideas imposed in our heads about what fit is flattering. And once I got past those views, I realized that unless you get something custom made, it's going to be really hard to find the perfect fit. And then if you have hips and a chest and you're shopping in the men's department, it's going to be even harder. So, you have to make some compromises. And everyone makes these compromises when they're shopping for clothes that are off the rack. But the ones that I make might be different than the ones for people who are looking to flatter a feminine figure. So I just became more comfortable with there being a little extra fabric in certain places. It just became normal to me. Things that used to look bad don't look bad to me any more.

 
Sonny wearing a wool baseball cap, a checkered Topman button-up, a navy sweater, navy pants, and navy boat shoes, posing in front of brick building. They are holding a folded newspaper and leaning one elbow a staircase ledge

Club Monaco Tyson Wool Baseball Cap, mens (similar) /
H&M Sweater, mens /
Topman White Grey Grid Long Sleeve Smart Shirt*/ Fourteen Pants (similar)
/ Sebago Docksides boat shoes / Everlane Backpack

 

What would you say is the main message you want your readers to take away from your blog?

You know more than you think. A lot of Qwear is inspiration-based, because I feel like so many blogs and magazines out there are advice-based. I feel that giving too much advice can actually get in the way because people will start to think that they can't figure things out on their own and they have to follow these rules, or that their instincts aren't good enough. We give some advice, but I'm trying to base it around inspiration so that people can build up their own understanding of their style and explore it from there.

How would you describe the actual style that is on your website?

I would describe it as a curation of queer style around the world. Of course my personal style is a big part of that since I'm the editor, and since I'm inspired by my city in Boston, I think it has a Boston vibe, with the preppy and collegiate feel. But I really try to display as wide a variety of styles as I can. So any time I come across anyone in the queer community doing something really cool, I want to just put it on Qwear. A photoshoot from someone I know in New Orleans is going up soon, and it's just going to be completely different from anything we've seen yet. (This is now up, see it here!) I discovered a group in South Africa that I want to do more with, I just thought it was the coolest thing ever. They're called BUWA Mosadi and they submitted a photo to me once.

We say in the advertising world that you can't be all things to all people. Would you say there is anyone that Qwear is not for?

If you want to follow all of the latest trends, or learn how to remain within our culture's standards of beauty, Qwear isn’t the place for you. I'll provide information on style trends if I really like them, but I'm not going to report on all the latest trends, and most of the styles we display are in some way not going to conform to our culture's standards of beauty. We are going to display styles of all types of beauty, all shapes and sizes, hair styles, etc. People who are into mainstream fashion might enjoy Qwear sometimes, but I don't anticipate it being their primary source of fashion news. 

Sonny wearing a wool baseball cap, a checkered Topman button-up, a navy sweater, navy pants, and navy boat shoes. They are sitting on stairs at a brick Harvard building with an Everlane backpack beside them

Where would you say that women/designated females shop who like to dress in a gender nonbinary way?

There are so many things that could make clothing nonbinary and it depends what culture you're in. I know someone from Scotland where all the men wear kilts, and she comes over here wearing a kilt and people think it's feminine. It all depends on where you are. Menswear has been popularized in women's clothes and tailored to look really feminine. So is that nonbinary, or is that just women's clothing? There are a lot of clothes in the women's department that are menswear inspired, but they'll often still have feminine elements and feminine tailoring that if you identify as more masculine, you might not enjoy wearing. I see people shopping in the men's departments or going to thrift stores, finding vintage items.

Can you talk to me more about the gender nonbinary trend happening recently?

Well, I wouldn't call it a trend because people who are dressing in a “nonbinary” way are doing so for a variety of reasons. For some people, it’s their identity and they have no choice if they're going to follow what's right for themselves. Some people have more of a fluid gender identity and love messing around with gender. Some people see gender as kind of a performance. And some people are doing it just because they love the style, and it's fun. All these reasons are totally valid. I think that breaking that barrier has been more prevalent lately as nonbinary folks have gotten more visibility and empowerment.

Photography: Sarah Naomi Champagne

TL;DR: A company doing research on fashion trends interviewed me, and I’m sharing my favorite tidbits. I discuss finding clothes that fit people FAAB, as well as embracing our different body shapes and finding ones own style. I also talk about who Qwear’s audience is and isn’t (not people big on trends!)

*Topman is sponsoring Qwear. Read about their sponsorship here.

Grunion Run Tie and Bow Tie Instagram Giveaway! [closed]

Grunion Run Tie and Bow Tie Instagram Giveaway! [closed]

Masculine Summer Style with Retro Inspiration

Masculine Summer Style with Retro Inspiration