Index

A

Accessories
Ace Style
Activists
Adidas
Allison Graham
A.L. Major
Alok Vaid-Menon
Alysse Dalessandro
Anna Rae
Androgyny
Angie Chuang
Anita Dolce Vita
Anthony Urbano
Ascots
Ashley Yielding
Athletic Wear

B

Backpacks
Bags
Bandanas
Basics
Bass
Beards
Beauty
Belts
Beyoncé
Bing
Bindis
Bisexual Style
bklyn boihood
Boi
Boots
Bolo Ties
Bow Ties
Black Outfits
Black and White Outfits
Black and Brown Outfits
Black History Month
Blake
Blazers
Blue
Braids
Bluestockings Boutique
Brooks Brothers
Bright Colors
Budget Shopping
Bullying
Butch Style

C

Cee Sando
Celebrities
Chains
Chinos
Collars
Collar Tips
College
Commentary
Community
Couples
Converse
Costumes
Courtney Stirn
Crop Tops
Cuffs

D

Dapper
DapperQ
Dandy
Denim
Desi
Dev Blair
Devin-Norelle
People with Disabilities
Dismantle Me
Dove
Dreads
Dr. Martens
Drag
Dresses

E


Eco Friendly
Editorial
Elbow Patches
Elders (55 +)
Engagements
Esther Quek
Events
Everlane
Express

F

Fanny Packs
Fat
Fat Femmes
Femme Fashion
Film
Fit
Fit For a Femme
Flannel
Florals
Formal
Fossil

G


Gender Expression
Genderflux
Giveaway
Glam Drag
Glasses
Glitter
Goth
Graduation
Green
Grunge
 

H

Hair
Hair Color
Halloween
Handkerchiefs
Hannah Cohen
Hats
Head Scarves
Head Wraps
Health
Heels
Hip Hop
History
Holidays
How to Wear

I


Indigenous
Indochino
Interview
Inspiration

J


Jack Tar 207
Jaime Marie Estrada
Janelle Monáe
Janet Mock
Jari Jones
Jaypix
Jeans
Jewelry

K


Kids (13-)
Kilts

L


Lace 
Lacoste
Latinx
Lavern Cox
Leggings
Leon Wu
Lesbian Style
Lingerie
Lipstick
LOL
LuzMarina

M


Make Up
Maternity Wear (for all genders)
Matriarch
Maximalism
Menswear
Minimalism
Modcloth
Monochrome Outfits
Mojo Disco

N


Natural Hair
Nautical
News
Nonbinary
Nordstrom
Novelty Prints

O


Orange
Overalls

P


Paisley
Pansexual
Pants
Patterns
Pattern Mixing
Performers
Personal
Petites
Piercings
Pink
Plaid
Plus Sizes
Pocket Squares
Polka Dots
Pomps
Posture Magazine
Power Clashing
Prep
Pride Style
Prom
Puma
Punk

Q


QTIPoC
Queer Desingers
Queer Fashion Shows
Queer Issues
Queer Owned
Qweary
Qwearly Dashing

R


Rainbow
Rayban
Red
Red Wings
Refashion Qwear
Review
Runway
Rupi
Ryley Rubin Pogensky

S

Saint Harridan
Sam Murray
Sarah Champagne
Sarah Rose
Sean/ Ex-Southern Belle
Seersucker
Sharpe Suiting
Shoes
Shopping
Skirts
Sneakers
Snap Backs
Socks
Soft Butch
Sonny Oram
Sporty
Spring
Street Style
Streetwear
Style Profile
Steam Punk
Submissions
Suits
Summer
Sun Sun
Swimwear

T

Tailoring
Tartan
Tattoos
Teal
Teens (14-19)
Ties
Tights/Stockings
Thrift Stores
Timberland
Tomboy
Tomboy Femme
Top Button Swag
Topman
Topshop
Trans Issues
Trans Health
Trans Style
Transfeminine
Transmasculine
Travel
Tutorials
Tuxedos
TV
Tweed
Two Spirit
Tya Roze

U

Ugly Sweaters
Uniqlo
Unisex
Undercuts
Underwear

V

Vans
Video
Vintage
Vegan

W

Watches
Wedding Style
Womenswear
Workwear
Winter
White Outfits
Xanh Tran

Y

Yellow

Z


Zara

Everybody Wanna be Trans, but Don’t Nobody Wanna be Trans

Everybody Wanna be Trans, but Don’t Nobody Wanna be Trans

By guest writer, Aaryn Lang. This article was originally posted on Aaryn’s facebook page.

Over the weekend my friends and I played around with the new gender-bending Snapchat filters. I found it hilarious, mainly because Snapchat’s beautifying and feminizing filters always lighten the skin and generally lean toward a more white appearance, but that’s a different story. Even with the laughs there was a tiny ache in my soul about how simple it all was knowing it will never be so simple(or free)for most of us to achieve our ideal expression in this lifetime. I also noticed that many other people found enjoyment in the filter as well, particularly cis people.

I’ve seen quite a bit of feedback from members of queer and trans community expressing displeasure over the larger society’s continued cognitive dissonance when it comes to gender variance within themselves and others, and I just want to remind everyone that most cis people are huge cowards in the realm of gender. What many see as a mockery, I see as gender play that has been marked safe by the masses. As trans folks, we often feel a righteous ownership on gender expression but it’s simply not ours alone. We are the lucky ones, though the state may not make it easier or safe for us. Most trans folks can tell you stories about the ways that our genders were policed as children and how that contributed to stress, trauma, confusion, and fear about who we truly are.

So I wonder, what happens to the folks who do not transition or identify as trans? What happens to those who have aligned with their prescribed gender presentation with no fuss, maybe just silent desires to paint their nails, wear long hair, or god forbid... send pictures of themselves in pantyhose to my DM’s?

Over the years I’ve seen many men in particular don wigs and terrible makeup in an effort to mock womanhood but I often feel there is a hidden layer to that performance: the joy of gender exploration. What do we say for those that need their exploration protected by the guarantee that it’s a mere joke? Gender terrorism touches us all, and I would love for moments like these to turn into opportunities for discussion and transformation instead of us taking ownership on an experience that doesn’t only belong to us.

I’m saying this at the risk of sounding like I am defending cis people, I am not. This filter and these shenanigans do perpetuate the dangerous idea that transness is simply a game of dress up and make-believe. In so many ways cis people are comforted by the mockery because it affirms the belief that we don’t exist, and that their scary gender desires do not either.

I’m a visible trans person because I want to push back against the violent system that is the gender binary. To me, cis people playing with gender expression (with a bit of knowledge and guidance) actually is a step in the direction of the world I would like to live in. I want little children and adults to show up how they feel best in this world without having to forfeit my own life or safety. I believe we can hold these tensions in an effort to better understand the impact of this short-sighted system on all of us, with the mission of making it all fucking suck much less. A girl can only dream...

 

headshot

Aaryn Lang

 

Aaryn Lang (Brooklyn, NY) is an artist, activist, and media host who self describes their work as using “unwavering honesty and humor to affirm the plight of black trans people everywhere.” Aaryn hosted the second and third seasons of New York Emmy-Nominated PBS show First Person, an interview-style series highlighting LGBT stories through intimate portraits of everyday life. You can follow Aaryn @AarynnLang on Instagram and @AarynLang on Twitter.

Pre-Loved Spring Clothing Pop-up: Remnant Brewing, Somerville

Pre-Loved Spring Clothing Pop-up: Remnant Brewing, Somerville

Show Your Pride: Clothing and Accessories Round-up

Show Your Pride: Clothing and Accessories Round-up