Index

A

Accessories
Ace Style
Activists
Adidas
Allison Graham
A.L. Major
Alok Vaid-Menon
Alysse Dalessandro
Anna Rae
Androgyny
Angie Chuang
Anita Dolce Vita
Anthony Urbano
Ascots
Ashley Yielding
Athletic Wear

B

Backpacks
Bags
Bandanas
Basics
Bass
Beards
Beauty
Belts
Beyoncé
Bing
Bindis
Bisexual Style
bklyn boihood
Boi
Boots
Bolo Ties
Bow Ties
Black Outfits
Black and White Outfits
Black and Brown Outfits
Black History Month
Blake
Blazers
Blue
Braids
Bluestockings Boutique
Brooks Brothers
Bright Colors
Budget Shopping
Bullying
Butch Style

C

Cee Sando
Celebrities
Chinos
Collars
Collar Tips
College
Commentary
Community
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Converse
Costumes
Courtney Stirn
Crop Tops
Cuffs

D

Dapper
DapperQ
Dandy
Denim
Desi
Dev Blair
Devin-Norelle
People with Disabilities
Dismantle Me
Dove
Dreads
Dr. Martens
Drag
Dresses

E


Eco Friendly
Editorial
Elbow Patches
Elders (55 +)
Engagements
Esther Quek
Events
Everlane
Express

F

Fanny Packs
Fat
Fat Femmes
Femme Fashion
Film
Fit
Fit For a Femme
Flannel
Florals
Formal
Fossil

G


Gender Expression
Genderflux
Giveaway
Glam Drag
Glitter
Goth
Graduation
Green
Grunge
 

H

Hair
Hair Color
Halloween
Handkerchiefs
Hannah Cohen
Hats
Head Scarves
Head Wraps
Health
Heels
Hip Hop
History
Holidays
How to Wear

I


Indigenous
Indochino
Interview
Inspiration

J


Jack Tar 207
Jaime Marie Estrada
Janelle Monáe
Janet Mock
Jari Jones
Jaypix
Jeans
Jewelry

K


Kids (13-)
Kilts

L


Lace 
Lacoste
Latinx
Lavern Cox
Leggings
Leon Wu
Lesbian Style
Lingerie
Lipstick
LOL
LuzMarina

M


Make Up
Maternity Wear (for all genders)
Matriarch
Maximalism
Menswear
Minimalism
Modcloth
Monochrome Outfits
Mojo Disco

N


Natural Hair
Nautical
News
Nonbinary
Nordstrom
Novelty Prints

O


Orange
Overalls

P


Paisley
Pansexual
Pants
Patterns
Pattern Mixing
Performers
Personal
Petites
Piercings
Pink
Plaid
Plus Sizes
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Polka Dots
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Posture Magazine
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Prep
Pride Style
Prom
Puma
Punk

Q


QTIPoC
Queer Desingers
Queer Fashion Shows
Queer Issues
Queer Owned
Qweary
Qwearly Dashing

R


Rainbow
Rayban
Red
Red Wings
Refashion Qwear
Review
Runway
Rupi
Ryley Rubin Pogensky

S

Saint Harridan
Sam Murray
Sarah Champagne
Sarah Rose
Sean/ Ex-Southern Belle
Seersucker
Sharpe Suiting
Shoes
Shopping
Skirts
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Snap Backs
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Soft Butch
Sonny Oram
Sporty
Spring
Street Style
Streetwear
Style Profile
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Submissions
Suits
Summer
Sun Sun
Swimwear

T

Tailoring
Tartan
Tattoos
Teal
Teens (14-19)
Ties
Tights/Stockings
Thrift Stores
Timberland
Tomboy
Tomboy Femme
Top Button Swag
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Trans Issues
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TV
Tweed
Two Spirit
Tya Roze

U

Ugly Sweaters
Uniqlo
Unisex
Undercuts
Underwear

V

Vans
Video
Vintage
Vegan

W

Watches
Wedding Style
Womenswear
Workwear
Winter
White Outfits
Xanh Tran

Y

Yellow

Z


Zara

Queer, Black, and in Love

Queer, Black, and in Love

Eziah Blake (they/them/theirs and he/him/his) also known as “Black Bear Extraordinaire,” is a 29-year-old Black, queer, and trans spoken word artist, singer, activist, from Dorchester, Massachusetts. Tanekwah Hinds (she/her/hers) is a bisexual, femme-dapper, Jamaican-American woman community organizer, activist, and health educator in Boston. They met at a queer community art event, and after that, the rest was history. For Valentines Day and Black History Month, we invited them to reflect on their style and relationship as a Black queer couple.

Tanekwah Hinds (left) and Eziah Blake (right)

How has your style changed since you got together?

Tanekwah: I tend to dress a little bit more feminine, which is something that I’m conflicted about. I think as much as I try to resist the gender binary and heteronormativity that I still succumb to the pressure, as the world perceives my partner and I as straight. But there is also strength and power in femininity. For the most part, I still embrace my dapper-femme style as I mix traditionally masculine clothes and accessories with a feminine touch, sometimes skewing more on one spectrum than another.

Eziah Blake: My style has definitely changed since Tanekwah and I have been together. She really introduced me to floral patterns and brighter colors. I wore them at first because she thought I looked cute in it. But then I took a liking to it. When I told her that I was interested in wearing black lipstick for the first time, she couldn’t wait to get it on me. Because of rigid gender norms enforced by society, I didn’t think something like that was possible even a year ago.

How do you feel about the representation of Black queer love in queer media?

Tanekwah: I would say in mainstream media, the representation of Black queer love is not very present. If it is, the relationship is usually through a very heteronormative lens. There is supposed to be someone who wears the pants and someone who is the caretaker, or more feminine, which caters to the gaze of straight people. I think the positive images that do exist are mostly gay men or lesbian women. I don’t see much representation of relationships for folks from our backgrounds whether it’s individuals who are bisexual or trans or Black. The media could really benefit from showing queer love that exists beyond whiteness and the gender binary.

 
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Eziah: I echo what Tanekwah said. I would also add that our media representation also suffers from colorism. Light skin folks are still seen as more desirable and represented in relationships and love. As a dark skin person, seeing that in the past has made me think I’m not one to be desired or attractive. I think giving more visibility to darker queer folks is important for the media moving forward.

Who inspires your style?

 
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Eziah: I really love Janelle Monáe. Her new album is dope. I’m not sure that I have an inspiration for my style. I kind of just get clothes that I’m drawn to or I think will look good on me and reaffirm my gender and my body. I have different looks depending on how I feel.

 
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Tanekwah: I look at different sources on social media for style inspiration. I especially like to draw inspiration from Instagram accounts for clothing, accessories, and makeup, like @DapperQ, @BowtieBehavior, and @ColourPop, and then mix and match different trends that I’m attached to. I really like to use my style to experiment with the fluidity of my sexual orientation and gender expression. Floral button-ups, over-sized sweaters, and patterned ties and bow ties catch my eye in the men’s department. My feminine statement pieces include a bold lipstick and eye shadow as well as geometric jewelry, head-wraps, and long cat nails. Like Eziah, I would definitely say that Janelle Monáe is a major inspiration. She was the first visibly Black woman who I saw rock dapper clothing with such confidence. I try to exude that same energy.

Where do you like to shop?

Tanekwah: I have really come to like Express lately. The store has these detailed, colorful patterned and floral shirts in their traditional men’s section that I love. I also shop this section at Old Navy and Primark for cheap finds. I shop for some of my more feminine clothes at Rebdolls, a size-inclusive online outlet. The internet also connects me to Black businesses, such as Bowtie Behavior and Philadelphia Print Works.

Eziah: I like to shop at Primark, Marshall’s and occasionally Old Navy. I want to look good but I’m not trying to break the bank. It’s hard out here. I think each of these places has really affordable clothes that are super stylish and provides me with options.

Walk us through your favorite outfit?

 
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Eziah: My favorite outfit definitely has gold involved. I love gold. Right now, I’m really feeling one of my recent looks. I’ve got gold sneakers, a gold & black letterman jacket, some black sweats, and a black & gold dashiki shirt. And to tie it all together I add the black lipstick and give my dreads that Kilmonger vibe. #WakandaForever

 
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Tanekwah: I would say my favorite outfit would be a button-up with bright colored floral patterns, a bowtie that plays up the bright colors, and a solid pants that pulls it altogether with dress shoes. I also think that an outfit is more than just the clothes. It’s the makeup and accessories as well. I really like to play up the color themes of the outfit with bright eye shadow and lipstick. Accessories are also everything from the tie to the hat to the watch.

How do you use fashion as a form of resistance against racism and queerphobia/ transphobia?

My fashion gives me the confidence to resist and continue to organize. When you look good, you feel good .
— Tanekwah

Tanekwah: To defy the notion that women can only wear feminine clothes. I embrace the fluidity of gender expression through my femme-dapper style. I also support small Black businesses, as white outlets and designers have historically dominated fashion choices. My fashion gives me the confidence to resist and continue to organize. When you look good, you feel good .

My first act of resistance is: I know I’m cute. I know I’m not supposed to think so because I’m dark, fat and trans. But I do and when I have on a look that really makes me feel good can’t nobody tell me nothing.
— Eziah

Eziah: My first act of resistance is: I know I’m cute. I know I’m not supposed to think so because I’m dark, fat and trans. But I do and when I have on a look that really makes me feel good can’t nobody tell me nothing. I’m trans “masculine” but if I wanna wear lipstick I will. I think it’s about speaking back to the “no”s and saying actually: yes I can and I did.

Style Profile: Plastique Pusséy, Los Angeles

Style Profile: Plastique Pusséy, Los Angeles

What's the T: A Celebration of Transfem Beauty

What's the T: A Celebration of Transfem Beauty