Index

A

Accessories
Ace Style
Activists
Adidas
Allison Graham
A.L. Major
Alok Vaid-Menon
Alysse Dalessandro
Anna Rae
Androgyny
Angie Chuang
Anita Dolce Vita
Anthony Urbano
Ascots
Ashley Yielding
Athletic Wear

B

Backpacks
Bags
Bandanas
Basics
Bass
Beards
Beauty
Belts
Beyoncé
Bing
Bindis
Bisexual Style
bklyn boihood
Boi
Boots
Bolo Ties
Bow Ties
Black Outfits
Black and White Outfits
Black and Brown Outfits
Black History Month
Blake
Blazers
Blue
Braids
Bluestockings Boutique
Brooks Brothers
Bright Colors
Budget Shopping
Bullying
Butch Style

C

Cee Sando
Celebrities
Chinos
Collars
Collar Tips
College
Commentary
Community
Couples
Converse
Costumes
Courtney Stirn
Crop Tops
Cuffs

D

Dapper
DapperQ
Dandy
Denim
Desi
Dev Blair
Devin-Norelle
People with Disabilities
Dismantle Me
Dove
Dreads
Dr. Martens
Drag
Dresses

E


Eco Friendly
Editorial
Elbow Patches
Elders (55 +)
Engagements
Esther Quek
Events
Everlane
Express

F

Fanny Packs
Fat
Fat Femmes
Femme Fashion
Fit
Fit For a Femme
Flannel
Florals
Formal
Fossil

G


Gender Expression
Genderflux
Giveaway
Glam Drag
Glitter
Goth
Graduation
Green
Grunge
 

H

Hair
Hair Color
Halloween
Handkerchiefs
Hannah Cohen
Hats
Head Scarves
Head Wraps
Health
Heels
Hip Hop
History
Holidays
How to Wear

I


Indigenous
Indochino
Interview
Inspiration

J


Jack Tar 207
Jaime Marie Estrada
Janelle Monáe
Janet Mock
Jari Jones
Jaypix
Jeans
Jewelry

K


Kids (13-)
Kilts

L


Lace 
Lacoste
Latinx
Lavern Cox
Leggings
Leon Wu
Lesbian Style
Lingerie
Lipstick
LOL
LuzMarina

M


Make Up
Maternity Wear (for all genders)
Matriarch
Menswear
Minimalism
Modcloth
Monochrome Outfits
Mojo Disco

N


Natural Hair
Nautical
News
Nonbinary
Nordstrom
Novelty Prints

O


Orange
Overalls

P


Paisley
Pansexual
Pants
Patterns
Pattern Mixing
Performers
Personal
Petites
Piercings
Pink
Plaid
Plus Sizes
Pocket Squares
Polka Dots
Pomps
Posture Magazine
Power Clashing
Prep
Pride Style
Prom
Puma
Punk

Q


QTIPoC
Queer Desingers
Queer Issues
Queer Owned
Qweary
Qwearly Dashing

R


Rainbow
Rayban
Red
Red Wings
Refashion Qwear
Review
Runway
Rupi
Ryley Rubin Pogensky

S

Saint Harridan
Sam Murray
Sarah Champagne
Sarah Rose
Sean/ Ex-Southern Belle
Seersucker
Sharpe Suiting
Shoes
Shopping
Skirts
Sneakers
Snap Backs
Socks
Soft Butch
Sonny Oram
Sporty
Spring
Street Style
Streetwear
Style Profile
Steam Punk
Submissions
Suits
Summer
Sun Sun
Swimwear

T

Tailoring
Tartan
Tattoos
Teal
Teens (14-19)
Ties
Tights/Stockings
Thrift Stores
Timberland
Tomboy
Tomboy Femme
Top Button Swag
Topman
Topshop
Trans Issues
Trans Health
Trans Style
Transfeminine
Transmasculine
Travel
Tutorials
Tuxedos
Tweed
Two Spirit
TyA Roze

U

Ugly Sweaters
Uniqlo
Unisex
Undercuts
Underwear

V

Vans
Video
Vintage
Vegan

W

Watches
Weddings
Womenswear
Workwear
Winter
White Outfits
Xanh Tran

Y

Yellow

Z


Zara

Style Profile: Ellie Medhurst, Reclaiming Pink

Style Profile: Ellie Medhurst, Reclaiming Pink

Meet Ellie Medhurst, a lesbian dress history graduate from Brighton, England who is turning the gender binary on its head. Ellie wears pink every day, along with other elements deemed feminine such as dresses, large bows, and flowers. She loves the brightness of pink and the positivity it adds to her everyday life — but that’s not the only reason she wears it. She also aims to reclaim pink and femininity by exposing the oppressive nature of the gender binary.

On her youtube channel, Ellie explores the social politics of dress. She explains that in Western culture, femininity is seen as weak, submissive, and delicate. “I feel the exaggeration of femininity is a threat to that idea of weakness,” she notes in her “The Politics of Pink Fashion” video.

Ellie’s dress is highly influenced by Japanese subcultures like Kawaii and Decora. Kawaii, which means lovable, cute, or adorable, takes stereotypes from western ideals about gender and turns them on their head — think Hello Kitty, Lolita fashion, and Pikachu. Decora is a subset of Kawaii characterized by wearing many decorations, often giving a childlike appearance. This notion of cuteness is a defining aspect of Japanese culture and “encompasses everything that is acceptable and desirable in Japan,” as stated by sociolist Nobuyoshi Kurita (栗田経惟).

In the video, Ellie reads a quote from Japanese Fashion Cultures by Masafumi Monden:

“The Japanese concept of Kuwai can be interpreted as a delicate revolt that softly and implicitly opposes and subverts stereotype preconceptions connected to sexuality and gender.
— Masafumi Monden, Japanese Fashion Cultures

Ellie notes that by being in your face these styles are not delicate but also not on the masculine side of the binary. They break down the walls between masculine and feminine ideals. Ellie hopes for a brighter future in which people don’t have to appeal to this oppressive system. “The binaries between male and female are not real. They are socially constructed. To confine people to one thing or the other is not okay. It’s not how things should be and it’s not how people have to live their lives.”

 
“The binaries between male and female are not real. They are socially constructed. To confine people to one thing or the other is not okay. It’s not how things should be and it’s not how people have to live their lives.”
 

Ellie has presented her paper "Walking Lesbian Flags: the re-appropriation of pink within queer femininities." at several conferences. She is also on the team behind the Queer Looks display currently on show at Brighton Museum, with her outfit among others donated to the museum as a way to showcase LGBTQ history and style. Get your daily dose of pink on her Instagram and learn more about her work on her Youtube.

 
unnamed-1.jpg

Pride

 
unnamed-2.jpg
 
 
unnamed-3.jpg
unnamed-1.png

Daytime

Beret: Thrifted
Yellow faux fur scarf:
ASOS
Coat: H&M
Dress and shirt: Vintage
Shoes: Irregular Choice

 
 
unnamed-4.jpg
 
 
unnamed.png
 
unnamed-5.jpg

Work

Hat: eBay
Blouse: “Found in the back of my wardrobe from years ago”
Rainbow Bodysuit: New Girl Order
Skirt: Topshop
Boots: Irregular Choice

 
unnamed-6.jpg
 
 
unnamed-7.jpg
 

Where did you grow up and where do you live now?

I grew up in Brighton in the UK and still live here — it's known as the gay capital of the UK and is a wonderful, accepting place to be.

How do you think your friends would define your style?

The main explanation would probably just be "pink," but with a heavy amount of gay signaling thrown in. You can see that I like to add rainbows to my looks, and I have a lot of pins and badges saying things like "gay icon." I also wear a pink denim jacket with the word “DYKE” sewn onto the back a lot; I think that words in clothing are a really interesting way that people can convey their identity and their queerness in a very explicit form, which is something I'm thinking about researching on my Masters degree next year.

What's your favorite item in your wardrobe?

I have a lot of clothes and they all mean different things to me. One of the most precious items currently in my wardrobe is a pink Vivienne Westwood top with a red foil heart on the front that my girlfriend left with me a few months ago. We're long distance at the moment and it makes me feel close to her when I wear it, as well as reminding me of our shared love of clothes.

What's your biggest style challenge?

I don't really think of style as a challenge. Sometimes it's
frustrating to put together an outfit and feeling like something's missing (who's got the budget, right?) but I've collected enough clothes over the years that I can normally figure something out. I wear pink every day, sometimes mixed with other colors, and that makes matching clothes a lot easier. I wrote my undergraduate dissertation on the color pink in the dress of queer people and I like to live that in my style every day.

Which literary figures do you most admire?

My favorite book is Sarah Waters''Tipping the Velvet,' and I suppose the dress of the working class lesbians in it is very empowering. I'm also very fond of the Havemercy book series by Jaida Jones and Danielle Bennett which is fantasy/steampunk, and when I first got into it I tried out steampunk style for a little bit!

Who's your style icon?

My style icon isn't any one person, but rather a collection of people. I like to hang about on social media, particularly Instagram, and see what other people are doing with fashion. Being able to see incredible outfits that other people all around the world are wearing is the biggest source of inspiration to me.


Qwear is volunteer-run and we rely on community support. If you enjoyed this article and have the means, please support us on Patreon.

Overcoming the Expectation that Make-up = Feminine

Overcoming the Expectation that Make-up = Feminine