Index

A

Accessories
Ace Style
Activists
Adidas
Allison Graham
A.L. Major
Alok Vaid-Menon
Alysse Dalessandro
Anna Rae
Androgyny
Angie Chuang
Anita Dolce Vita
Anthony Urbano
Ascots
Ashley Yielding
Athletic Wear

B

Backpacks
Bags
Bandanas
Basics
Bass
Beards
Beauty
Belts
Beyoncé
Bing
Bindis
Bisexual Style
bklyn boihood
Boi
Boots
Bolo Ties
Bow Ties
Black Outfits
Black and White Outfits
Black and Brown Outfits
Black History Month
Blake
Blazers
Blue
Braids
Bluestockings Boutique
Brooks Brothers
Bright Colors
Budget Shopping
Bullying
Butch Style

C

Cee Sando
Celebrities
Chains
Chinos
Collars
Collar Tips
College
Commentary
Community
Couples
Converse
Costumes
Courtney Stirn
Crop Tops
Cuffs

D

Dapper
DapperQ
Dandy
Denim
Desi
Dev Blair
Devin-Norelle
People with Disabilities
Dismantle Me
Dove
Dreads
Dr. Martens
Drag
Dresses

E


Eco Friendly
Editorial
Elbow Patches
Elders (55 +)
Engagements
Esther Quek
Events
Everlane
Express

F

Fanny Packs
Fat
Fat Femmes
Femme Fashion
Film
Fit
Fit For a Femme
Flannel
Florals
Formal
Fossil

G


Gender Expression
Genderflux
Giveaway
Glam Drag
Glasses
Glitter
Goth
Graduation
Green
Grunge
 

H

Hair
Hair Color
Halloween
Handkerchiefs
Hannah Cohen
Hats
Head Scarves
Head Wraps
Health
Heels
Hip Hop
History
Holidays
How to Wear

I


Indigenous
Indochino
Interview
Inspiration

J


Jack Tar 207
Jaime Marie Estrada
Janelle Monáe
Janet Mock
Jari Jones
Jaypix
Jeans
Jewelry

K


Kids (13-)
Kilts

L


Lace 
Lacoste
Latinx
Lavern Cox
Leggings
Leon Wu
Lesbian Style
Lingerie
Lipstick
LOL
LuzMarina

M


Make Up
Maternity Wear (for all genders)
Matriarch
Maximalism
Menswear
Minimalism
Modcloth
Monochrome Outfits
Mojo Disco

N


Natural Hair
Nautical
News
Nonbinary
Nordstrom
Novelty Prints

O


Orange
Overalls

P


Paisley
Pansexual
Pants
Patterns
Pattern Mixing
Performers
Personal
Petites
Piercings
Pink
Plaid
Plus Sizes
Pocket Squares
Polka Dots
Pomps
Posture Magazine
Power Clashing
Prep
Pride Style
Prom
Puma
Punk

Q


QTIPoC
Queer Desingers
Queer Fashion Shows
Queer Issues
Queer Owned
Qweary
Qwearly Dashing

R


Rainbow
Rayban
Red
Red Wings
Refashion Qwear
Review
Runway
Rupi
Ryley Rubin Pogensky

S

Saint Harridan
Sam Murray
Sarah Champagne
Sarah Rose
Sean/ Ex-Southern Belle
Seersucker
Sharpe Suiting
Shoes
Shopping
Skirts
Sneakers
Snap Backs
Socks
Soft Butch
Sonny Oram
Sporty
Spring
Street Style
Streetwear
Style Profile
Steam Punk
Submissions
Suits
Summer
Sun Sun
Swimwear

T

Tailoring
Tartan
Tattoos
Teal
Teens (14-19)
Ties
Tights/Stockings
Thrift Stores
Timberland
Tomboy
Tomboy Femme
Top Button Swag
Topman
Topshop
Trans Issues
Trans Health
Trans Style
Transfeminine
Transmasculine
Travel
Tutorials
Tuxedos
TV
Tweed
Two Spirit
Tya Roze

U

Ugly Sweaters
Uniqlo
Unisex
Undercuts
Underwear

V

Vans
Video
Vintage
Vegan

W

Watches
Wedding Style
Womenswear
Workwear
Winter
White Outfits
Xanh Tran

Y

Yellow

Z


Zara

This is What Asexual Looks Like Part 3, Femme Edition

This is What Asexual Looks Like Part 3, Femme Edition

I’m Yasmin Benoit (@theyasminbenoit), an alternative model and asexuality activist from Berkshire, England. 

 
 Processed with VSCO with a6 preset
 

After gaining a platform through my modeling, I decided to publicly come out as asexual in late 2017 with the goal of providing more representation for asexual people. Since then, I’ve came to realize that there are actually more asexual people out there than you would originally assume, but we largely go unseen. It’s our lack of visibility which contributes to prevalent and harmful stereotypes about asexual people.  

 
190518_YasminBenoit_183.jpg
 

A misconception that I’ve encountered a lot is that there is an asexual way to look or dress, and it’s not a good one. Asexual people are assumed to be “too unattractive” to get a partner. At the same time, we’re not supposed to make ourselves look “attractive” by dressing up because we’re not trying to sexually entice anyone. Not only does this assume that people only dress to please others and not themselves — it means that asexual people can’t win either way.   

 
IMG_6950.jpg
 

When I was given the opportunity to write for Qwear, I decided to start the #ThisIsWhatAsexualLooksLike series and hashtag to give the agency back to asexual people, so that we could represent ourselves. I wanted to give us a platform to show that there is no asexual way to look or dress. In this edition of the series, I chose to focus on asexual femmes, to highlight our experiences navigating a world which sexualizes us and our self-presentation. I’m grateful for all of the asexual people who have participated in this new chapter of the series. 

thumbnail_IMG_1416.jpg

Valerie (@valer_himiko) is an 18-year-old art student from the Czech Republic. She captured my attention with her amazing Instagram looks, which she describes as “Coachella but every day.” But her artistic skills expand much further than fashion – check out her animations on YouTube and her incredible make-up looks if you don’t believe me.

 
“For me fashion is a way to express myself, experiment with new things, and create my own art.”
— Valerie
 
thumbnail_IMG_7689.jpg

“I wear a lot of chokers, mesh tops, fishnets, and faux fur coats. I also create my own clothes.

“There is a quote saying that ‘the way we dress doesn't mean yes.’ That is true but in my opinion, it doesn't mean anything at all, as I hate stereotypes! If I want to wear a bralette on top of a T-shirt, I just wear it. And if I feel like wearing a cycling jersey with high boots or even pajamas to school then I am going to wear it. For me fashion is a way to express myself, experiment with new things, and create my own art. Fashion does define me, but it in no way determines who I am. I can wear ‘sexy’ clothes and still be an asexual.”

 
 
thumbnail_IMG_9780.jpg

“It annoys me that people tend to sexualize clothing, because it doesn't make any sense. It is regarded as normal to wear just a normal skirt, but the minute I wear the same skirt with knee highs or fishnets everyone sees a sexual subtext in it despite me being actually more covered. Fashion should be about the freedom and being yourself. And this is what I am trying to do.”

IMG_5167.jpg

While probably best known for being a stunning “Instagram model,” I came across Ashley (@omgyoash) on YouTube, where I was thrilled to see another woman of color speaking about her experiences as an asexual person. But there’s definitely much more to Ashley than her looks.

 
“My goal is to raise the calibration of human consciousness.”
— Ashley Marie
 
IMG_5166.jpg

“My goal is to raise the calibration of human consciousness. I believe this is why I was put on this earth with no sexual desire — it does not run me what-so-ever. My ‘style’ has changed a lot throughout my life, but how I decorate my avatar does not represent who I am as a person. For the sake of argument, currently I would classify my style as a typical ‘Instagram model’: fake hair, nails, eyelashes and seductive poses.”

 
IMG_5169.JPG

“Though I’ve always loved to decorate myself in the latest trending beauty fashions, it has drastically evolved since I started modeling roughly 10 years ago. I dress as tactic to attract people on the most instinctive level: impulse. Once captivated, My goal is that once captivated, they will look into me on a deeper level, typically provided on my YouTube channel @omgyoash or my second Instagram @asharmada.”

 
 
7.jpg

Candex Louie (@dexgenerate) is a nonbinary trans Taiwanese-Chinese artist, activist, and writer, currently based in Los Angeles. Candex is pan/aro grey-asexual.

IMG_4980[1].jpg

"My style is playful and fluid (being a genderfluid nonbinary person is definitely expressed through my fashion as well) but I like to have a lot of contrast in my outfits; I combine tacky or loud prints or colors in an otherwise formal silhouette, or neutral colors and formal pieces folded or tucked or unbuttoned in ways that skew the shape. My style is a big part of my gender expression as well as my aroace orientation.”

 
“I’m generally quite comfortable with my body and wearing clothes that can be considered revealing, because I don’t see or experience bodies as being inherently sexual.”
— Candex Louie
 
IMG_20181211_094243[1].jpg

"I'm generally quite comfortable with my body and wearing clothes that can be considered revealing, because I don't see or experience bodies as being inherently sexual. Though I'd add that bodies can be sexual, and that's also something to celebrate and be proud of, if that's what you like."

 
44966245_10157881994948835_6732707419433992192_o.jpg

Jasmin, also known as Aidenn Queen (@aidennqueen), was one of the first people I wanted for this article. I was captivated by her amazing alternative modeling work, and was intrigued to learn that she is also an artist, DJ, singer, and event organizer in Austria.

 
“I slip into different roles just for the fun of it.”
— Aidenn Queen
51018156_10158151686023835_6807902409772236800_o.jpg

"My style has never been clear cut. A normie would probably shove me in the ‘goth’ box on most days, even though I also love colors and try to mix and match styles. I slip into different roles just for the fun of it."

 
 
49203185_10158054132868835_7952196677996118016_o.jpg

"It doesn't make much difference to me if I wear concealing or revealing clothes — it just has to fit the persona I'm presenting at the time, which depends entirely on my mood and whims. I don't have any issue with showing skin, or even nudity. But I really dislike when others think they can presume anything about my sexuality based on my clothing choices.

“Since I started training a year ago, I have an urge to show it off more, but to me it has nothing at all to do with any sexuality — even if others don't often understand that."

ACS_0298.JPG

Stephanie Zambrana is an investigator in New York City, who is a panromantic grey-asexual. Despite identifying as asexual since 2010, she didn't become more involved in the community until 2016. She now runs the @aces_nyc Instagram page, a meet-up page for asexual and aromantic people in NYC.

 
 
ACS_0305.JPG

"If someone asked me how I would describe my style I would look them dead in the eye for a moment before taking a sip of my old fashioned and say: ‘Unironically Retrofuturistic Ravenclaw.’"

“If someone asked me how I would describe my style I would look them dead in the eye for a moment before taking a sip of my old fashioned and say: ‘Unironically Retrofuturistic Ravenclaw.’”
— Stephanie Zambrana
 
IMG_4304.JPG

"Noir, specifically the femme-fatale archetype, has always inspired me. The bold smoldering looks, the silhouettes, just that look of ‘probably untrustworthy, but you're gonna tell her your secrets anyway.’

"Now, this archetype is (quite literally) defined as a seductive woman, which doesn't really seem compatible with my asexuality. And I have run into problems in the past because of this. But I have (slowly) learned to say ‘fuck it’ and embrace my aesthetic."

CYMERA_20170820_000415.jpg

Marie (@twykad on Instagram and Twitter) is web design graduate from France who identifies as a pan-ace non-binary female. "When I discovered that asexuality was actually a thing it was one of the biggest relief I ever felt in my life: I wasn't broken, or wrong, or sick," they told Qwear.

 
 
CYMERA_20180704_155002.jpg

"As I believe that style and sexual orientation or gender identity are not always linked ... my style doesn’t really intersect with my asexuality nor does it always intersect with my gender. I’ve had remarks about me not being nonbinary because I mostly dress feminine. And I don’t scream to the world about my asexuality but I’m pretty sure that some would feel the need to invalidate it for the way I sometimes dress."

IMG_20160708_180720.jpg

"My style is very versatile, almost always feminine but I do have days where I need to be more androgynous. Everything to me is about aesthetic and feeling comfortable in what I’m wearing. A lot of people would say that I’m always overdressed — will it shock you if I say that it isn’t how I personally feel?"

 

Want to contribute to asexual visibility? Share your looks using the #ThisIsWhatAsexualLooksLike hashtag on your social media!  

 
 

 
 

We are volunteer-run and we rely on community support!

Vote for Qwear as the Best LGBT Blog of 2019!

Vote for Qwear as the Best LGBT Blog of 2019!

Style Profile: Ellie Medhurst, Reclaiming Pink

Style Profile: Ellie Medhurst, Reclaiming Pink